Candied Lemon Peel

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3 lemons
8 cups cold water, or as needed
2 cups white sugar, or as needed

Cut lemons into slices about 1/4 inch thick and remove the fruit pulp. Cut the rings in half so the peels are in long strips.

Bring water and lemon peel to a boil in a small pan. Drain water, and repeat with fresh cold water. Repeat the boiling step three times (see Editor’s Note). Drain and set peels aside.

Combine 2 cups fresh water with 2 cups sugar. Bring to a boil, stirring to dissolve the sugar. Reduce heat to low and stir in citrus peels; simmer until the white pith is translucent. Store peels in syrup, refrigerated, to keep them soft, or allow them to dry. Toss dry candied peels in additional sugar and store airtight at room temperature.

Roasted Chickpeas

gluten-free-roasted-crispy-chickpeas

1 (12 ounce) can chickpeas (garbanzo beans), drained
2 tablespoons olive oil
salt
garlic
cayenne pepper

Preheat oven to 450 degrees F (230 degrees C).
Blot chickpeas with a paper towel to dry them. In a bowl, toss chickpeas with olive oil, and season to taste with salt, garlic salt, and cayenne pepper, if using. Spread on a baking sheet, and bake for 30 to 40 minutes, until browned and crunchy. Watch carefully the last few minutes to avoid burning.

Confit d’Oignons au Vin Rouge

confit d oignons

My recipe theme for August is recipes of famous artists.  I came up with this theme as I started research recipes for our cabaret night in August.  Since the Les Hydropathes, who later occupied the Le Chat Noir  in the bohemian Montmartre district of Paris, were not famous for their cooking; I had to resort to the recipes of famous artists and writers.  Although I do believe the Confit d’Oignons au Vin Rouge was a popular item back then.

INGREDIENTS (20 PEOPLE)

1kg Roscoff onions
37,5cl red wine (bordeaux)
4 tbsp of raspberry vinegar
25g of four spices [Quatre Epices]
4 tbsp honey
olive oil

DIRECTIONS:

Peel and finely slice the onions.
Heat a saucepan with the olive oil and sweat the onions.
Reduce to very low heat and add the other ingredients. Simmer and simmer for 45 minutes. Long cooking will reduce onions, wine and vinegar.
Salt before leaving to cool in a pot.

Salvador Dalí’s Avocado Toast

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I haven’t tried this recipe and if you look at the ingredients you will discover, why.  I’m not sure if I will ever have the courage to make this recipe.

Salvador Dalí’s Avocado Toast

Ingredients:

3 AVOCADOS
1 LAMB BRAIN
9 OZ. MINCED ALMONDS
12 SLICES OF RYE BREAD
3 TBSP. TEQUILA
⅓ CUP VINEGAR
½ CUBE OF BEEF BOUILLON
SALT
CAYENNE PEPPER

Directions:

Among the delicacies is a simple recipe for a rather decadent spin on avocado toast. The first step: Soak the lamb brains (a specialty of French cuisine) in cold water, remove their outer skin, and place back in the water. Meanwhile, boil a pint of water; add vinegar and beef bouillon. Remove the brains from the water, drain to remove excess water, and mix with avocado pulp. Then add minced almonds, salt, cayenne pepper, and tequila. Spread on toasted slices of rye.

Marcel Duchamp’s Steak Tartare

Marcel Duchamp’s Steak Tartare

Ingredients:

½ POUND CHOPPED RAW BEEF
2 EGGS
CHOPPED RAW WHITE ONION
BRIGHT GREEN CAPERS
CURLED SLIVERS OF ANCHOVY
FRESH PARSLEY, CHOPPED FINE
BLACK OLIVES MINUTELY CHOPPED IN COMPANY WITH YELLOW CELERY LEAVES

Directions:

With an eye for artistic arrangement, Duchamp specifically recommends that you prepare the dish on an ivory plate “so that no pattern will disturb the distribution of ingredients.” First, arrange beef “with artistry into a bird’s nest,” and place egg yolks in its hollow core. Surrounding the nest, in the shape of a wreath, place bouquets of onion, capers, anchovy, parsley, and chopped olives with celery leaves. “Each guest, with his plate before him, lifts his fork and blends the ingredients with the egg yolks and meat,” he concludes. “In center of table: Russian pumpernickel bread, sweet butter, and bottles of vin rosé.”

Edam Cheese Souffle

Ingredients:

3 tbsp butter
2 tbsp  grated Parmesan
2 tsp flour
½ cup milk [use water for lighter low calorie option]
½ cup grated Edam Cheese
pinch cayenne pepper
pinch nutmeg
pinch salt
2 eggs

Directions:

Heat oven to 375° F.

Grease two 16-ounce [for a two-course menu] or four 8-ounce ramekins [for a four course menu] with 1 tablespoon of butter. Coat with the Parmesan, then tap out the excess. Set aside.

In a small saucepan, over medium heat, melt the remaining butter. Stir in the flour and cook 1 minute. Whisk in the milk and cook, stirring constantly, until the sauce boils, 1 minute. Remove from heat and stir in the cheese until melted. Blend in the cayenne and nutmeg. Whisk in the yolks one at a time. Set aside. (The recipe can be made to this point up to 1 day ahead. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate.)

In a clean bowl, beat the egg whites with the salt until stiff (but not dry) peaks form. Stir 1/4 of the egg whites into the cheese sauce to loosen it. Gently fold in the remaining egg whites. Spoon into the ramekins. Bake until puffed and browned, 40 minutes for a 16-ounce soufflé, 20 minutes for two smaller ones. Serve immediately.

Kale Tabbouleh

Eats by Blaly

Kale was the bane of my existence from 2012-2015. Every single place I went was obsessed with the hot new trend, and now that I am off my high-horse, I can see that obsession was justified. Kale is bitter, has a weird texture, and overall, is pretty terrible on its own. Luckily, it makes a great salad green because it retains its structure when combined with dressing, unlike its wimpy, wilty, friends. Combine it with a great dressing, grains, and cherubs and you’ve got a winner.

This tabbouleh is everything good about life these days. I often find myself coming home from work and sitting at the island eating it right out of the bowl. It is filling, nutritious, and allows you to tip-toe into international food waters without totally committing. It tastes best after some time in the fridge, and is a great treat for the warmer weather. Time to…

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